A HOCKEY STAR TELLS A MUST HEAR MJ STORY

12/10/19

Jay C. Brandriet

 

Jeremy Roenick was a nine time NHL All-Star. He played pro hockey in Chicago during Michael Jordan’s prime. He recently weighed in on MJ’s competitive side.

 

(I’m paraphrasing. The full interview can be seen on the Mcneil and Perkins show)

The question was asked, “Did you ever gamble with Jordan on the course?”

 

Roenick said, “It was the early 1990’s when the Bulls were on fire. It was the end of the season for us, and the end of the season for them. I get an early morning call from Michael who wants to meet up at Sunset Ridge. He wanted to play 18 holes.”

“We played a round, and I beat him for a couple of thousand. I’m getting ready to leave. The Bulls play Cleveland that night. It’s 10am and I’m thinking he’s leaving. He’s like, “no let’s go play again.”

“We fill up a bag of ice and Coors light, and we walk again. We roll around another 18, and I take him for another couple Gs. Now we’ve been drinking all afternoon. He’s getting ready to go from Sunset Ridge to the stadium.”

“I’m messing around and I say, I’m gonna call my bookie. I’m going to bet all the money you just lost to me on Cleveland.”

“MJ goes, “I’ll tell you what. I’ll bet the money I owe you that we win by 20 points and I score over 40.”

 

“I said, done!”

 

“After 36 holes of golf and maybe 10 beers…Son of a gun goes out and scores 52 and they win by 26.”

“Michael Jordan is the best athlete I’ve ever seen or been around. The way he presented himself and played the game was just amazing.”

“After halftime I knew my money was gone. So much for 36 holes of hard grinding.”

Cleveland had 4 All-Stars, and won 48 games.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE ACTUAL RESULTS

This happened March 28th 1992.

The Bulls won the game by 24, 126-102.

Jordan had 44 points on 21-32 shooting (65.6%).

He chipped in 6 assists, 4 rebounds, 3 steals, with just 1 turnover.

 

I’m not suggesting playing golf with beers is the best way to prepare for an NBA game.

I’m saying Michael’s thirst to compete was hard to satisfy.

 

Jay C. Brandriet

 

 

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